You can use the tile widget to visualise a single value. This widget can only display data from a single data source.

A screenshot showing an example with two tile widgets

In the sidebar

A screenshot showing an example of the general properties of the table widget

General: use the general properties of the sidebar to add a name and subtitle for your tile or adjust the widget’s appearance.

  • Choose whether the title of the widget should be displayed. If you enable this, then you can provide a title and icon for the widget and specify the font sizefont colour and text alignment.
  • Choose whether a subtitle for the widget should be displayed. If you enable this, then you can add a subtitle for the widget and specify the font sizefont colour and text alignment.
  • Specify the widget width within the section where it appears.
  • Choose the background and border colour for the widget.

A screenshot showing an example of the instructions properties for the table widgetInstructions: here you can add static informational content which will appear below the title of the widget. This can include text, images, tables, links and other common content tools.

A screenshot showing an example of the data properties for the table widget

Data: to connect your tile with a data source, use the tile value properties to add and filter the value that the tile will display.

A screenshot showing an example of the values properties for the tile widgetValue: here you can choose what value will populate your tile widget.

  • Choose which field from the selected data source you want the tile to display.
  • Select the data type that you want the field to display as. You can choose from date, number, string or image. If you select the image data type (which will display an image field from an event form), clicking on the image will also expand it to full-screen.
  • Choose the type of aggregation for the field. Each data type will offer different aggregation options to choose from.
  • If you’ve selected the count aggregation type, choose whether unique values only should be used. When this option is ticked, each unique value in the dataset is aggregated. If left unticked, all values in the dataset will be aggregated.
  • Depending on the data type selected for your tile, you can adjust the format. For example, dates can be shown in mm/dd/yyyy or dd/mm/yyyy, and numbers can have any number of decimal places.
  • Choose the font size, text colour and alignment of your tile value.

A screenshot showing an example of the caption properties for the tile widget

Caption: if you want to provide more context for the people viewing the tile, you can use a value caption to indicate units and further context. The caption’s font size and alignment can also be adjusted here (however the caption colour is dependent on the colour chosen for the tile value).

A screenshot showing an example of the icon properties for the tile widget

Icon: another way to add context to your tile is by adding an icon.  You can choose from a large list of standardised icons, as well as set the icon’s colour and size.

A screenshot showing an example of the layout properties for the tile widget

Layout: this setting will determine the orientation of the elements of your tile. For example, you may wish for the tile’s icon to display below its value instead of beside it, which can be achieved using a vertical layout.

A screenshot showing an example of the interaction properties for the tile widget

Interaction: if you want to provide users with more information about the data displayed in a table, you can set up different interactions using the interaction properties.

A screenshot showing an example of a record card

There are two interactions you can enable for a tile widget – record cards and record click-through.

  • Record cards: when record cards are enabled, then the card fields that are set will be shown in a pop-up screen when the tile is selected. If multiple records are aggregated to create the tile’s value, you can click on an individual record to see its record card.
  • Record click-through: this property can only be enabled when the record card property is also enabled. Turning on record click-through means that people can navigate from the record card to the event form record that the relevant data is sourced from. If multiple records are shown in the record card (for example, when data from a group of athletes is shown in the chart), then the user will need to select a specific record from the record card before clicking through to that particular record.

A screenshot showing an example of the conditional formatting properties for the tile widget

Conditional Formatting: you can use the conditional formatting properties of the tile widget to apply a ruleset. When you do this, the relevant ruleset colour will be applied to the tile’s background so you might wish to choose font and icon colours for the tile that won’t be obscured by colours in your ruleset. Otherwise, you can also instruct the tile to automatically choose a legible foreground colour based on its background colour.

If your ruleset includes an icon, it will replace the value icon for the tile when the conditions for the ruleset are met.

A screenshot showing an example of the advanced properties for the tile widgetAdvanced properties: use the advanced properties to customise the text displayed, or hide the tile altogether, when no data is available (based on data source and filter settings).

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